Susan Sloate: My Cousin Fred & the Power of the Broadway Musical Sunday, Sep 29 2013 

Susan’s original post became garbled when it loaded; some of you might have had trouble reading her neat story about her cousin Fred. So here it is again in its entirely. And don’t miss Susan’s new release, Stealing Fire.

HOW DO YOU RECOGNIZE YOUR SOULMATE?
In glittery 1980’s Los Angeles, Beau Kellogg, a brilliant lyricist now reduced to writing advertising jingles, yearns for one last Broadway hit to compensate for his miserable marriage and disappointing life.
Amanda Harary, a young singer out of synch with her contemporaries, dreams of appearing in Broadway musicals while she holds down a day job at a small New York hotel.
When the two meet in a late-night phone conversation over the hotel switchboard, it’s the beginning of something neither has ever found—an impossible situation that will bring them both unexpected success, untold joy and piercing heartache… until they learn that some connections, however improbable, are meant to last forever.
STEALING FIRE is, at its heart, a story for romantics everywhere, who believe in the transformative power of love.

Stealing_Fire_Front_7

My Cousin Fred & the Power of the Broadway Musical

 

By Susan Sloate

 

 

 

     Let me tell you about my cousin Fred. Fred was the failure of my family. (And no, I didn’t plan all that alliteration.)  This is my father’s side I’m talking about now. On my father’s side were all people who came from poor backgrounds, who determined they weren’t going to be poor in the future, and in the 1920’s, ‘30s and ‘40s rolled up their sleeves, started their own businesses, worked long hours, sacrificed, and yes, became very wealthy. (And God bless them; I didn’t realize for many years how much I owe them and how hard they worked to make my life wonderful. But that’s another story.)

 

     My cousin Fred, however, wasn’t a start-your-own-business kind of guy. He had another dream. To support that dream, he took a job in a shoe store in New York in the 1950’s.

 

     None of my relatives had a problem with the shoe store. They understood starting at the bottom. What they had a problem with was Fred’s dream: he wanted to be a (gulp) songwriter.

 

     What was worse, in my relatives’ opinion, was that he didn’t even want to write the music. Oh, no. Fred wanted to write just the words for these songs. Seriously.

 

     “You call that a career?” my aunts, uncles and grandparents would bellow. “What are you thinking? You got a good job at the shoe store; if you work hard, who knows, someday you might become the store manager. Think big, Fred!”

 

     I don’t know how Fred felt, hearing that ongoing vote of confidence, but he persevered anyway. He teamed up with a composer friend and they wrote their little songs. And eventually they met a young girl with a big voice who had lots of energy and ambition. She wasn’t all that pretty, but she could belt out a song.

 

     So all three of them worked together and eventually got their big break, with an off-Broadway show they wrote the score for and their singer friend starred in.

 

     Flop.

 

     I know; you thought it was going to end with their all showing up my relatives, right?

 

     My relatives took that failure as proof that they were right; Fred needed to focus on the shoe store. Fred took it differently.

 

     And my relatives finally did stop bugging him about his career in feet on the night he got them house seats for his new Broadway show … CABARET.

 

     Seriously.

 

     My cousin Fred was Fred Ebb, half of the musical team of Kander & Ebb, who also wrote the scores for CHICAGO, ALL THAT JAZZ, and the movie FUNNY LADY. And that energetic young girl they worked with? Her name is Liza Minnelli, and she introduced their most famous song, “New York, New York”. Start spreading the news, indeed.

 

     Kander & Ebb are not just a Broadway success story; they are legendary. (And I promise, all of the above is true. How can you not believe a family story?) Fred Ebb, sadly, is no longer with us. But for the purposes of this blog, what’s important to know is that by the time I was old enough to hear Fred’s story, he was already a Broadway superstar. Also, my mother had studied voice and wanted to sing on the musical stage herself, and that was my first career dream as well. So I was raised with Broadway musicals—old ones, new ones, famous ones, not-so-famous ones, hits, flops. I knew their stories, I knew their stars, producers and creative teams, I knew how they came to be hits or flops. To this day, I can still sing more than a hundred show scores from memory. I’m praying someday someone invents a game show entirely about Broadway musicals. I’ll be a million-dollar winner, guaranteed.

 

     So many years ago, when I sat down to write about a complex love affair I was living through and didn’t want my characters to have the same jobs or lives as we did, it was natural for me to set the story in the musical theater. I’d grown up in it; I’d actually written a musical at the age of 14 (book and lyrics), with a close friend. And yes, I still dream of writing for the musical theater. If you should really ‘write what you know’—well, it was something I knew, all right.

 

     The beginning of what I called for years my ‘baby novel’ was about two characters much like my love and me. Within just a few pages, I found he had become a Broadway lyricist (no, not modeled on Fred, but I’m sure his story was at the back of my mind). I became the girl who was studying to be a singer on Broadway (which I’d once desperately wanted; funny how things change when you realize you have no talent). In real life, the guy was a novelist/screenwriter and I was working at becoming a novelist/screenwriter. It wasn’t the same thing, but on the other hand, it was.

 

     The novel which finally emerged from many years of writing, putting it down, and picking it up again is titled STEALING FIRE, and it’s just been published by Drake Valley Press. And the reason (apart from plain old fear and procrastination) that it hasn’t been published till now is just that I really had no idea how the story was supposed to end, and for a long time I wasn’t sure it mattered. I told myself for a long time that this was just therapy during a tough period long ago, that it didn’t have any relevance for me now. It had nothing to do with the me of today.

 

     But it kept nagging at me. It’s hard to ignore 275 pages of passionate pleading, especially when you wrote them. You can’t just throw all that stuff out. I took it out again when I stumbled on the Amazon Breakthrough Novel Award Contest. I had one week to get in my entry, and in that one week, I cut 100 pages, wrote 100 new pages (new scenes, connections between scenes) and basically finished it, though I still wanted to clean it up a little.

 

     I got it into the contest with about 30 minutes to spare, panting all the way, and was thrilled when it was named a Quarter-Finalist in 2012. I promised myself I’d publish it, and when Drake Valley Press and I found each other earlier this year, all the stars seemed to align.

 

     STEALING FIRE is about the musical theater, yes, but it’s mostly about a love affair between unlikely soul mates, but soul mates nonetheless—people who have no business understanding each other so well, but because they do, they change each other’s lives. It’s about a love most of us only dream about, but few of us ever know. I’m grateful that what I lived through all these years ago is now down on the page for readers to experience along with me, and I hope they’ll believe such a love is possible—because I know from experience that it is.

 

     I think what I loved most about writing it was that since Beau was a lyricist, I got to write song lyrics again, something I hadn’t done for many years. The challenge, of course, is that I set up Beau as a really superb lyricist, far above other lyricists in the musical theater. So the lyrics I wrote for him had to be, of course, superb.

 

     Well… not sure I nailed that, but there are three song lyrics that Beau ‘wrote’ in the novel. Whether you’ll think they’re good or not is debatable. But wherever he is, I hope my cousin Fred is proud.

Susan Author Photo 2013 Author Photo Copyright 2013 Vicki Faith

 SUSAN SLOATE is the author of 20 books, including her latest, Stealing Fire (which went to #2 in its category on Amazon the day it was published), the upcoming JFK time-travel thriller Forward to Camelot: 50th Anniversary Edition (with Kevin Finn) and Realizing You (with Ron Doades), for which she invented a new genre: the self-help novel. The original 2003 edition of Forward to Camelot went to #6 on Amazon, took honors in 3 literary competitions and was optioned by a Hollywood company for film production.
 Stealing Fire has autobiographical elements, including Susan’s love for the musical theater. She is proud to be distantly related to Fred Ebb, the legendary Broadway lyricist of Cabaret, Chicago, All That Jazz, and “New York, New York”.
Susan has also written young-adult fiction and non-fiction, including the children’s biography Ray Charles: Find Another Way!, which won the silver medal in the 2007 Children’s Moonbeam Awards. She has been a sportswriter and a screenwriter, managed two recent political campaigns and founded an author’s festival in her hometown outside Charleston, SC. Visit her online at http://susansloate.com.

 

 

 

Rosie Genova: Murder and Marinara: An Italian Kitchen Mystery Sunday, Sep 22 2013 

Auntie M is enjoying the Bouchercon Mystery Convention in Albany, participating in a panel discussion on amateur sleuths and conducting several interviews she’ll share this fall.

Today, please welcome guest Rosie Genova, whose mystery Murder and Marinara debuts October 1st. Rosie will describe the influence of an early murder case on her writing career. Rosie, over to you:

I love working in the genre of cozy mysteries, with their small communities, quirky characters, and murders that happen offstage. I’m happy to leave the darker stuff to those who do it well. But while my passion for mysteries has its roots in the work of Agatha Christie and Dorothy Sayers, it was also fed by a more gruesome source—a real life 19th century murder.

For me, it all started with Lizzie Borden, a figure who besides Nancy Drew is probably responsible for the careers of many a mystery writer. By the time I was fourteen, however, I’d outgrown Nancy, and my aunt was reading a book about Borden. It may well have been Edward Radin’s book, Lizzie Borden: The Untold Story, a work that posited Lizzie’s innocence.

Once I opened it, I was hooked. Everything from the ghastly murder scene photos to the days-old mutton that the parsimonious Mr. Borden insisted serving the family caught my imagination, not to mention the unanswerable questions. Why did Lizzie reportedly buy poison the day before the murder? Why did she burn a blue corduroy dress in the kitchen stove? What of the mysterious houseguest, John Morse? And Bridget Sullivan, the maid who was none too fond of the Bordens—might she have served as Lizzie’s accomplice? Or was that role played by Lizzie’s sister Emma?

 Borden housePhoto courtesy of Wikimedia Commons.

After that book, many others about Lizzie followed, and it was impossible not to get pulled into the repressive and stultifying world that she inhabited. It was easy to imagine the locked house, the oppressive August heat, and one too many dinners of leftover mutton. Lizzie lived in a family and community whose strictures regarding women bound her as tightly as her corset and many layers of clothing. Her father, a man typical of his era, was a rigid patriarch who brooked no opposition. Lizzie had lost her mother at a young age, and she made no bones about her antipathy toward her stepmother Abigail, not exactly a warm and fuzzy type. Despite a life of physical comforts, Lizzie must have felt very much like a prisoner in Andrew Borden’s house. A year before the murder, the Borden house was robbed of cash and jewels, with Lizzie the prime suspect. Was it a play for attention? An indication of the greed that might have been behind the murder of Abigail and James Borden? Or simply a way to have some income of her own?

Photos of Lizzie Borden depict a face nearly devoid of expression. But there is an eerie, otherworldly light in those pale eyes. Behind those unsettling eyes and attractive but blank face, was there a seething anger that manifested itself in a bloody act of violence? A reading of the bald facts of the case points to Lizzie’s guilt; my own instincts tell me that her rage finally erupted that day, in the most terrible way imaginable. So why am I on her side?

Lizzie Borden Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

And I know I’m not alone. A quick search of Lizzie’s name will garner a number of websites devoted to the murder, and an even greater number of fans devoted to Borden herself. We’re secretly glad that Lizzie was acquitted, that she and her sister inherited her father’s large estate and bought a lavish home. And though Lizzie lived her life under a shadow of suspicion, she also lived it as a free woman. But at what price?

(For a detailed and fascinating account of the Borden case, see the UMKC Law School Famous Trials website.)

Rosie Genova, mystery author

rosiesig

Murder and Marinara: An Italian Kitchen Mystery (Book 1)

Release date: October 1, 2013

 

·        

·      

·   

Amazon Link

Author Bio:A Jersey girl born and bred, Rosie Genova left her heart at the shore, which serves as the setting for much of her work. Her new series, the Italian Kitchen Mysteries, is informed by her deep appreciation for good food, her pride in her heritage, and her love of classic mysteries from Nancy Drew to Miss Marple. An English teacher by day and novelist by night, Rosie also writes women’s fiction as Rosemary DiBattista.  She lives in central New Jersey with her husband, two of her three Jersey boys, and an ill-behaved fox terrier.

Social Media:

www.rosiegenova.com     

www.facebook.com/RosieGenova

Goodreads link

Hit whodunit writer Victoria Rienzi is getting back to her roots by working at her family’s Italian restaurant. But now in between plating pasta and pouring vino, she’ll have to find the secret ingredient in a murder…. 

When Victoria takes a break from penning her popular mystery series and moves back to the Jersey shore, she imagines sun, sand, and scents of fresh basil and simmering marinara sauce at the family restaurant, the Casa Lido. But her nonna’s recipes aren’t the only things getting stirred up in this Italian kitchen.

Their small town is up in arms over plans to film a new reality TV show, and when Victoria serves the show’s pushy producer his last meal, the Casa Lido staff finds itself embroiled in a murder investigation. Victoria wants to find the real killer, but there are as many suspects as tomatoes in her nonna’s garden. Now she’ll have to heat up her sleuthing skills quickly…before someone else gets a plateful of murder.

Advance Praise:

“The tastiest item on the menu with colorful characters, a sharp plot, and a fabulous Jersey  setting.  I enjoyed every bite.”- Jenn McKinlay, New York Times bestselling author

“Clever and intriguing…..It definitely left me hungry for more.”- Livia J. Washburn, author of the Fresh Baked Mystery series.

Upcoming release:   The Wedding Soup Murder, Summer 2014

 

 

 

 

Robert Weibezahl: The Dead Don’t Forget Sunday, Sep 15 2013 

Please welcome guest Robert Weibezahl and his Hollywood thriller, sitting in for Auntie M at Bouchercon this week~

The Dead Don't Forget FR CV

       The Dead Don’t Forget

 

 

There has been a few year’s hiatus between the publication of my first crime novel, The Wicked and the Dead, and my new one, The Dead Don’t Forget. Both feature the amateur sleuth Billy Winnetka, whose day job is screenwriting, so it should be no surprise that the books are set in Los Angeles amid the business of filmmaking.

But rather than tap into a world saturated by TMZ, paparazzi, and celebrity tweets, my books try to capture the experience of Hollywood’s ordinary working stiffs – how the other half (or 90 percent) lives, if you will.

 

 

That said, there is a bit of glamour in The Dead Don’t Forget, albeit faded with time. At the mystery’s center is Gwendolyn Barlow, a once huge but mostly forgotten film star living out her final years in her now shabby mansion.

Billy meets Gwendolyn when he is corralled by his old friend, Grace, into attending a lifetime achievement award ceremony in Gwendolyn’s honor. What should have been a one-night encounter turns into a full-time job for Billy when the old woman reports that she has been receiving anonymous phone calls threatening her with death.

Ever curious, if equally reluctant, Billy is soon investigating the source of those calls and the more serious life-threatening events that begin to unfold.

 

 

In the course of his investigation, Billy compiles an ever-mounting list of suspects. Who knew that an old, forgotten silent screen actress could have antagonized so many people?

He also meets Gwendolyn’s lawyer, Kate Hennessey, and romance blooms (complicating his already complicated lingering attachment to his ex-wife, Rae).

Meanwhile, one of Billy’s screenplays is in production, being directed by an egotistical neophyte. One crisis after another on the set threatens to shut the film down, and in true Hollywood fashion, the wrong heads roll.

 

The Dead Don’t Forget, like The Wicked and the Dead before it, is entirely a work of fiction, but having worked for a time in film production, I hope I am able to bring some measure of verisimilitude to my depiction of the movie industry. A bit cynical, but fundamentally genuine, Billy provides an unfiltered lens through which to view this singular, eccentric world.

The screenwriter William Goldman famously wrote, “In Hollywood, no one knows anything.” Well, Billy wouldn’t argue the basic truth of that quote, but he’s learned a thing or two. If only someone would listen.

 

Bob copy_pp

 

Having worked in the publishing and film businesses for more than a quarter century, Robert Weibezahl has a broad range of credits. A columnist for BookPage since 2002, his work has also appeared in the Los Angeles Daily News, Los Angeles Reader, Ventura County Star, Mystery Readers Journal, Bikini, Irish America, and many other national and regional publications.

His two literary cookbooks/anthologies—A Taste of Murder  and A Second Helping of Murder—co-edited with Jo Grossman, were both finalists for the Agatha and Macavity Awards.

His short fiction has appeared in Futures Mysterious Anthology Magazine, CrimeSpree, Mouth Full of Bullets, Beat to a Pulp, and the anthology, Deadly by the Dozen, and he was a finalist for the Short Mystery Fiction Society’s 2010 Derringer Award.

Visit him at http://www.RobertWeibezahl.com.

 

Libby Fischer Hellmann: Havana Lost Sunday, Sep 8 2013 

FINALHL ebookWhilst Auntie M recovers from jet lag from her England odyssey, please welcome author Libby Fischer Hellmann, talking about her newest thriller HAVANA LOST:

Where Did HAVANA LOST Come From Anyway?

 

 

So…I was talking to my sister on the phone after I finished A BITTER VEIL. I was already about 60 pages into my next Georgia Davis thriller, but something was keeping me from diving back in. I started thinking about writing a World War Two thriller—I’m continually drawn back to that period of time, where some people were heroes, others cowards, and you never knew whom to trust. Unfortunately, I realized right away there was probably nothing I could write about that time period that hasn’t been done better by someone else.

 

Our phone conversation turned to other time periods and settings, and my sister brought up Cuba. As soon as she mentioned it, I started to get that itch—the kind of itch that can only be scratched by delving more deeply into a subject. We both remembered my parents flying down to gamble in Havana. This was when Batista was still in power. I must have only been about 6 or 7, but I remember being jealous that they were going to a foreign country and culture. I wanted to go. Of course, they didn’t take me.

 

A few years later Fidel took over and Cuba was suddenly off limits to Americans. Soon afterwards it turned Communist, and Communism was our enemy! Because of that, Cuba seemed even more mysterious and exotic than ever, and I wanted to know more about it. Then, of course, came the Bay of Pigs, followed fifteen months later by the Cuban Missile Crisis, which made Cuba even more impenetrable and threatening. So close and yet so far. Fidal Castro with Nikita Khrushchev in Moscow, 1963

 

Finally, and I’m not ashamed to admit it, I recalled one of the Godfather films where Al Pacino (Michael Corleone) and Lee Strasberg (Meyer Lansky) are on a rooftop supposedly in Havana discussing how they’re going to own the island. Shortly after that, Michael sees a rebel willing to die in order to overthrow Batista. Michael changes his mind about doing business with Lansky. 4godfather65989754_8200a37e1a_z

 

That clinched it. I realized I had most of the elements for a terrific thriller: revolution, crime, conflict, an exotic setting. And while I knew it would be a stand-alone story, rather than a series, there is a thematic link between HAVANA LOST, and the two previous stand-alone thrillers I’d written: A BITTER VEIL and SET THE NIGHT ON FIRE. That theme is revolution and what it does to an individual, a family, a community, a country, a culture.

 

There was only one other element I needed.  I enjoy—actually it’s more than that… it’s probably an obsession at this point—writing about women and the choices they make. I needed a female character who would have been thrown into the middle of the volatile situation. It would be fascinating to see what she did and how she coped. Once I came up with Frankie Pacelli, the daughter of a Mafia boss who owns a Havana resort, the rest was, as they say, history.

 

 299260_1015lfhellman1404827983406_767050619_nYou can learn more about Libby and her books at:

 

 

 

 

 

German Author Beate Boeker on Strong Women and Mystery Sunday, Sep 1 2013 

What do you do when you find your grandfather dead half an hour before your cousin’s wedding? You hide him in his bed and tell everyone he didn’t feel like coming.delayeddeath

Delayed Death is an entertaining mystery set in Florence, Italy. When Carlina finds her grandfather dead on the day of her cousin’s wedding, she decides to hide the corpse until after the ceremony. However, her grandfather was poisoned, and she becomes the attractive Inspector’s prime suspect. On top of that, she has to manage her boisterous family and her luxurious lingerie store called Temptation, a juggling act that creates many hilarious situations.

Delayed Death is the first mystery in the series Temptation in Florence. The second, Charmer’s Death, and the third, Banker’s Death, are also available. http://amzn.to/VMeCUz

Auntie M asked me to write about strong women, and when I started out with that topic, I first wondered what defines a strong woman. Is it success? Is it the fact that she can live alone, without help from anybody? Is it, just to mention one particularly difficult task, being able to raise a family single-handedly?

 

 

 

I’m not so sure.                   Cover_Charmers_Death

 

She may not be successful because she may have turned her back on the stuff that she would have had to do to be traditionally successful. Maybe she wasn’t willing to sacrifice herself for that. That’s not a sign of a weak woman. Maybe she can’t live alone and needs help – and to a certain extent, we all do need help at certain points in our lives.

 

 

 

Nevertheless, I would not say that this makes us weak women. Raising a family single-handedly certainly is something that requests iron strength and great organizational capacities. Sometimes, however, this makes us more feel like a wreck than a strong woman.

 

 

 

No, the more I thought about it, the more I realized that to me, the most important feature of a strong woman is a woman who manages to be happy. Whatever you do and whoever you are, if you are happy with what you do, then you are strong.

You are strong because you have made the right choices for your personal happiness. You are strong because you held fast to your beliefs, no matter what others said. Being profoundly happy with your life is something that doesn’t drop from heaven above. It comes because you were willing to fight for the things you believe in and to see them through. It comes from getting over hurt feelings, of leaving the past behind you and of moving on.

 

 bankersdeath14k

 

The heroine in my cozy mystery series Temptation in Florence is a strong woman. She has her own little universe – a lingerie store in the historical center of Florence, Italy. It is tiny and her family is not always sure that this is a good profession, but she loves her job.

She once was engaged to a very rich man who owned a large estate / vineyard. However, when she realized that he expected her to give up her job and independence and to be the perfecting accessory in HIS universe, she broke off the engagement – much to the horror of her large family. But she is happy, and that’s what counts. I hope you’ll enjoy getting to know her!

Beate Boeker is a traditionally published author since 2008 and has 11 novels and short stories online available. Some of them were shortlisted for the Golden Quill Contest, the National Readers’ Choice Award, and the “Best Indie Books of 2012” contest.

Beate is a marketing manager by day and a writer by night. She has a degree in International Business Administration and her daily experience in marketing continuously provides her with a wide range of fodder for her novels, be it hilarious or cynical.

Widely traveled, she speaks German (her mother language), English, French and Italian and lives in the North of Germany together with her husband and daughter.

While ‘Boeker’ means ‘books’ in a German dialect, her first name Beate can be translated as ‘Happy’ . . . and with a name that reads ‘Happy Books’, what else could she do but write novels with a happy end?                  Author_Picture_Beate_Boeker_at_water

Although being German, she has chosen to write in English because she appreciates the professional support and training opportunities a writer can find in the US.
Learn more about Beate at www.happybooks.de

Contact:
Beate Boeker
Mischief & Humor from Page 1

Website: www.happybooks.de

Facebook page:
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Beate-Boeker/153573758044433?ref=ts&fref=ts

Twitter: @BeateBoeker

Goodreads author page: http://www.goodreads.com/author/show/1679907.Beate_Boeker

Book trailer: http://www.happybooks.de/104-0-the-question.html

Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Beate-Boeker/e/B001JSC5DC

 

The Life of Guppy

the care and feeding of our little fish

dru's book musings

Reading is a wonderful adventure!

JoHanna Massey

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan

MiddleSisterReviews.com

(mid'-l sis'-tǝr) n. the reader's favorite sister

My train of thoughts on...

Smile! Don't look back in anger.

Make

make Your House a home

K.R. Morrison, Author

My author site--news and other stuff about books and things

Wicked Cozy Authors

Mysteries with a New England Accent

Some Days You Do ...

Writers & Writing, my own & other people's; movies, art, music & the search for a perfect flat white - the bits & pieces of a writing life.

Gaslight Crime

Author and reviewer of period crime fiction

Crimezine

#1 for Crime

Mellotone70Up

John Harvey on Books & Writing - his own & other people 's - Art, Music, Movies, & the elusive search for the perfect Flat White.

A thrilling Murder-Mystery...

...now being made into a radio drama

BOOK SHELF

"Tell me and I forget-Show me and I remember-Involve me and I learn"

Past Offences: Classic crime, thrillers and mystery book reviews

The best mystery and crime fiction (up to 1987): Book and movie reviews

forensics4fiction

Forensics demystified for the fiction writer

milliewonka

Just another WordPress.com site

Eco Women: Protectors of the Planet!

Saving the planet one day at a time.

The Life of Guppy

the care and feeding of our little fish

dru's book musings

Reading is a wonderful adventure!

JoHanna Massey

“Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known.” ― Carl Sagan

MiddleSisterReviews.com

(mid'-l sis'-tǝr) n. the reader's favorite sister

My train of thoughts on...

Smile! Don't look back in anger.

Make

make Your House a home

K.R. Morrison, Author

My author site--news and other stuff about books and things

Wicked Cozy Authors

Mysteries with a New England Accent

Some Days You Do ...

Writers & Writing, my own & other people's; movies, art, music & the search for a perfect flat white - the bits & pieces of a writing life.

Gaslight Crime

Author and reviewer of period crime fiction

Crimezine

#1 for Crime

Mellotone70Up

John Harvey on Books & Writing - his own & other people 's - Art, Music, Movies, & the elusive search for the perfect Flat White.

A thrilling Murder-Mystery...

...now being made into a radio drama

BOOK SHELF

"Tell me and I forget-Show me and I remember-Involve me and I learn"

Past Offences: Classic crime, thrillers and mystery book reviews

The best mystery and crime fiction (up to 1987): Book and movie reviews

forensics4fiction

Forensics demystified for the fiction writer

milliewonka

Just another WordPress.com site

Eco Women: Protectors of the Planet!

Saving the planet one day at a time.