Peter Robinson: Many Rivers to Cross Tuesday, Jan 14 2020 

Peter Robinson’s 26th Alan Banks mystery, Many Rivers To Cross, brings today’s issues to the forefront in the long-running series. Robinson manages to remain timely while bringing a fresh perspective to Banks, his colleagues, and detecting.

A young Middle Eastern boy’s body is found stuffed into a garbage bin, and with no identifiers or missing persons report, it takes Banks and his team a while to find his identity.

Found on the East Side Estate, interviews with the few neighbors provide little information other than that of a car engine leaving the area of the old woman whose bin has been used as a dump site.

Then a heroin addict is found dead in his home in an estate scheduled to be torn down for redevelopment. Are the two deaths related and are drugs involved? Or are illegal immigrants and trafficking at the bottom of these deaths?

With information from other squads pointing Banks toward organized crime in his beloved Eastvale, Banks must separate the twisted threads to find out the truth.

A fascinating subplot follows a friend grappling with her past and dealing with the trauma. Add to that Banks’s musical choices, and readers will be treated to a police procedural that keeps on winning on all fronts.

MC Beaton: Beating About the Bush Sunday, Jan 12 2020 

MC Beaton brings Agatha Raisin back for a new adventure in Beating About the Bush.

The private detective’s newest case concerns an elderly woman whose body–or parts of–are found in the shrubbery on the road out of town.

Soon Agatha and her accomplice, Toni, are involved in a case of espionage at a factory. And did Auntie M mention there’s a donkey involved? And Russians?

There’s also Sir Charles Fraith back on the scene, complicating Agatha’s heartstrings.

In her 30th outing, Agatha’s irascible personality veers from harsh to witty to charming. Fans will not be disappointed, and the general consensus is that the books far outweighs the charms of the television series.

Johana Gustawsson: Blood Song Wednesday, Jan 8 2020 


Gustawsson’s third in her award-winning Roy and Castells series, Blood Song, ties in events of the heinous acts during the brutal dictatorship of Franco’s regime with a series of murders in Falkenberg, Sweden, during contemporary times.

If this seems an unlikely connection, it will be clarified as readers become involved with Scotland Yard’s newest profiler. Alienor Lindbergh’s family have died under especially horrific circumstances, murdered in the wealthy family’s Swedish home.

With her profiler mentor, Canadian Emily Roy, accompanying Alienor home for the investigation, and French true-crime writer Alexis Castells involved, the unlikely trio will soon find that there is a tie to fertility clinics as well as to the sad and terrifying brutality of the orphanages of Franco’s Spain.

As the body count continues to rise, the women use the Swedish police resources as well as their own knowledge to figure out what’s been happening. There will be side trips and tough interviews as the darkness that happened decades ago deeply shadows modern times.

Gustawsson’s Authors Note bears reading first to ground the reader in the research and reasoning in connecting the two time periods. It’s a dark and unpredictable story, with an ending that is extraordinary.

Deborah Crombie: A Bitter Feast Sunday, Dec 29 2019 

Crombie brings her married detectives, Duncan Kincaid and Gemma James, outside their home turf in A Bitter Feast.

The Scotland Yard Detective Superintendent and his Inspector wife are having a lovely weekend with their three children in the Cotswolds’ Glouchestershire valley, courtesy of Melody Talbot, Gemma’s sergeant.

Melody’s palatial family home, Beck House, befits the publisher of one of London’s largest newspapers. A charity harvest luncheon will take place this weekend, catered by local chef Viv Holland, once at a Michelin-starred restaurant, now running a local pub.

But a car accident coupled with several resultant murders have a deep impact on the gathering, and lead Duncan and Gemma to lead the sleuthing, helping the locals. It’s soon apparent that there’s a strong connection to Viv’s pub, and the weekend gets getting extended as the couple, along with members of their team, try to figure out who’s doing the killing, and why.

One of the hallmarks of Crombie’s series is how deeply she researches the neighborhoods of her mysteries, and the rolling hills and golden stone homes are a delight. Vintage Crombie.

Elly Griffiths: Now You See Them Wednesday, Dec 25 2019 

Merry Christmas! And to celebrate, here’s a gift for you, a great read from Elly Griffiths:

Elly Griffiths’ Brighton series takes a leap eleven years after The Vanishing Box to 1964 in New You See Them. The swinging 60s bring readers into time of mods, rockers, and a changing culture.

An awful lot has changed in the intervening years. Edgar Stephens is now the police Superintendent, married to Emma Holmes, with three young children. His former sergeant finds being sidelined after marriage an uncomfortable place to be, even though she loves her children and husband.

Edgar’s Army pal, magician Max Mephisto, has gone Hollywood, marrying a star, with two young children of his own, after starring in a movie. His talented daughter, Ruby, took television by storm, and stars in her own British series.

They reunite in Brighton for the funeral of their mutual old friend when Edgar’s new case puts out fingers that have them all involved. A young girl from the tony girl’s school, Roedean, has gone missing. Has she really left to go to London, as evidenced by the note she left behind?

Then the connection is made between two other missing woman, all who left notes behind, and some of the Roedean girl’s clothing is found in a most unexpected place.

Exploring the dark side of Brighton in this strange new world, with change all around them, soon has each main character questioning her or her choices, as the race heats up to find the missing young women.

The period details and Griffiths’s wit add to the crackling mystery. Here she brings out Emma Holmes’ character: “Reading Film Frolics was one of Emma’s weaknesses; her photographic memory was one of her strengths.”

A highly delightful read with deeper layers to the characters than at first glance. @ellygriffiths

Vanda Symon: The Ringmaster Tuesday, Dec 24 2019 

After introducing Sam Shepherd in Overkill, the newly-minted New Zealand detective returns in The Ringmaster.

With a move to the university town of Dunedin, rooming at the home of her best friend’s aunt and uncle, Sam is a lowly detective constable with an unerring sense of human nature.

Sam clashes with her boss, who keeps her under his thumb, yet is forced to include her on the fringes of an investigation into the murder of a university researcher. The young woman’s work was the envy of her doctoral colleagues, yet Sam suspects the motive to be far more personal.

With a local circus in town, Sam connects several unsolved murders to dates of visits by this traveling circus, and soon the interviews are interminable. This is where Symon shines, as she manages to bring humanity to the various workers, and even the animals. There will be more tragedy, some that impacts Sam personally, before the stunning and unforeseen climax.

Symon brings the New Zealand setting wrapped into the story so well its stark beauty becomes another character with her vivid imagery. The series will make you want to visit the area.

But the story belongs to Sam, feeling her way in what is still very much a man’s police world here. Her wit and foibles make her a very likable and identifiable young woman, one readers will have no difficulty following.

Look for book 3 in the series, Containment, in the US in early 2020. Highly recommended. @OrendaBooks @vandasymon.

Stuart Neville: Those We Left Behind & So Say The Fallen Sunday, Dec 15 2019 

Stuart Neville’s 5th and 6th Belfast novels center around DCI Serena Flanagan. In Those We Left Behind, Flanagan flashes back to an old case years earlier, a bloody massacre that left a foster father dead and the younger of two brothers the family had taken in confessing to the killing.

Now this younger brother, Ciaran Devine, is out of prison, and back in her radar. With his older brother, Thomas, out for a year already and working in a kitchen, Flanagan knows the brothers have kept a secret for all of their time in prison.

There’s an almost unnatural attachment between the brothers, one that leads to renewed violence. Ciaran’s probation officer is a young woman with good instincts, and she brings her fears to Flanagan’s attention, just as a series of brutal attacks start.

How culpable is Ciaran? Who is committing these crimes and can they be traced to the brothers? It’s a tough situation, especially when these brothers cost Flanagan time away from her own family and impact her strained marriage.

When the fear enters her own home, Flanagan will do anything to protect those she loves. Compelling and creepy.

In So Say The Fallen, Flanagan is trying to salvage her marriage and her family when she’s called to the site of an apparent suicide. The loss of his legs and extensive burns suffered in a traffic accident have left Harry Carrick, owner of a car dealership empire, at the mercy and care of his wife. It’s not a surprise when he decides to take an overdose of his pain medicine.

But two things are at odds to Flanagan: the man’s apparent strong faith, and the family photos arranged on his night stand that are turned away from his view. It’s enough for her to question his widow, Roberta, already suffering the loss of the couple’s only child a few year’s earlier in a tragic drowning accident. Not everyone appreciates Flanagan’s viewpoint.

Roberta’s stalwart friend and defender is the Reverend McKay, a man who’s own faith has been under examination. With Flanagan’s suspicions aroused, she decides to pursue an investigation to assure that Harry Carrick really did take his own life. Her tenacity is one of her strongest characteristics, as is her determination to get to the truth.

A spooling out of the plot leads to a climax with a depth of betrayal by one of the characters that leads Flanagan to question everything she understands about relationships.

Both books are well-plotted and smack of the weary realism of real investigative work, while expounding the life force such a job takes, and how it impacts the detective’s family. These are terrific police procedurals that will please any reader. Neville gets inside his character’s heads with a mix of deep chill and at times great compassion. Highly recommended.

Stuart MacBride: All That’s Dead Wednesday, Dec 11 2019 

It’s been a year since the events of the last Inspector Logan McRae novel, and the detective is back at work hoping for a simple case. Assigned to Professional Standards should be an easy assignment, but nothing is ever easy for Logan.

He’s sent to follow-up and then to monitor DI King, after a reporter has sent copy he intends to publish, indicating King was once in a Scottish National terror group.

The bad press alone would be bad enough, but King has just been assigned to the disappearance of a professor known for his Scottish anti-independence stance. Nicholas Wilson isn’t at home, but the amount of blood left behind in his kitchen indicates a severe injury if not murder.

Logan will find himself seconded to the inquiry and the usual suspects become involved, from the eccentric DI Steel to his old friend Tufty. Infighting within the police appears rampant, too, with officers on both sides of the equation.

Using the political heat of the times, MacBride offers a complex and dark plot relieved by the lightness of some of his characters. Logan is the voice of reason, the sane one in the pack.

Readers familiar with the series and those new to it will find themselves swiftly submerged in the story and all of its tendrils. MacBride just keeps getting stronger with each novel. Highly recommended.

Keigo Higashino: Newcomer Friday, Dec 6 2019 

Tokyo’s Detective Saga has been transferred to a new district in Newcomer. Experienced, and with his own way of unraveling truths, Kaga is part of the team sent to investigate the murder of a woman.

As he follows the trail of clues, Kaga comes across more than one story, told in linked chapters, and manages to get to the bottom of several others, all having smaller secrets in this neighborhood.

He will trace the woman’s last days, visiting shops and cafes she visited, piecing her movements together, and delving into her past.

One of the things Kaga knows is human nature. Readers will learn Japanese culture while Kaga unravels the stories of those in the realm of the dead woman.

Yet he never loses sight of the real target: the killer of a woman who was just coming into her own.

Auntie M enjoys Kaga for his inscrutable nature, which manifests itself in his infinite patience and in his ability to read people. A highly satisfying read.

Anne Cleeland: Murder in the Blood Sunday, Nov 24 2019 

Anne Cleeland’s Doyle & Acton series returns with another grand installment in the series Publisher’s Weekly praises with: “Distinctive characters compliment the finely wrought highly charged plot.”

The time the fey police sergeant Doyle and her Chief Inspector and multi-titled husband run into a nest of Spanish aristocrats with murder on their minds. As the bodies have mounted up, the person behind the murders has been difficult to pin down.

And it isn’t Doyle’s imagination that her husband, prickly and evasive at the best of times, has something on his mind. With threads of several cases adding up, Doyle fears her husband has something up his titled sleeve.

Add to that the dreams Doyle has at time, with portentous visits of spirits and even the ghost of a knight at her husband’s family home, and you have enough ingredients for a fast-paced mystery that takes the usual procedural and twists it on its head.

Doyle’s Irish accent adds a charm to her character as the new mother juggles her young son with work, overlapping cases, and the designs of her husband behind the scenes. She’s also the voice of reason to Acton, and she despises the trappings of his aristocratic heritage as much as she loves the man.

There will be a wedding and christening before Doyle has to assume yet another title at her husband’s familial estate. Being Lady Acton there is bad enough. It’s a cracking good mystery with a most unusual married pair at the helm.

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Lee Lofland

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Lee Lofland

The Graveyard Shift

S L Hollister, author

Welcome to Leeward

Liz Loves Books

The Wonderful World of Reading

The Life of Guppy

the care and feeding of our little fish

dru's book musings

Reading is a wonderful adventure!

JoHanna Massey

"I tramp the perpetual journey." Walt Whitman

MiddleSisterReviews.com

(mid'-l sis'-tǝr) n. the reader's favorite sister

My train of thoughts on...

Smile! Don't look back in anger.

K.R. Morrison, Author

My author site--news and other stuff about books and things

The Wickeds

Wicked Good Mysteries

John Bainbridge Writer

Indie Writer and Publisher

Some Days You Do ...

Writers & Writing, my own & other people's; movies, art, music & the search for a perfect flat white - the bits & pieces of a writing life.

Crimezine

#1 for Crime

Mellotone70Up

John Harvey on Books & Writing - his own & other people 's - Art, Music, Movies, & the elusive search for the perfect Flat White.

A thrilling Murder-Mystery...

...now being made into a radio drama

Past Offences: Classic crime, thrillers and mystery book reviews

The best mystery and crime fiction (up to 1987): Book and movie reviews