Death at the Dakota: Trudy Genova Manhattan Mysteries 2 Wednesday, May 1 2019 

Auntie M is happy to announce that her second Trudy Genova Manhattan Mystery. DEATH AT THE DAKOTA, is out and availabLe on Amazon.com in trade paperback and soon to be in Kindle. Coming in Audible later this summer, too, read by the wonderful Lucinda Gainey, Dakota is already garnering 5-Star reviews.

Part procedural, part cozy, Death at the Dakota is a well-crafted and highly entertaining mystery.- Bruce Robert Coffin, #1 bestselling author of the Detective Byron mysteries.

Nurse Trudy Genova is making plans to take her relationship to NYPD detective Ned O’Malley to the next level, when she lands a gig as medical consultant on a film shoot at the famed Dakota apartment building in Manhattan, which John Lennon once called home. Then star Monica Kiley goes missing, a cast member turns up dead, and it appears Trudy might be next. Meanwhile Ned tackles a mysterious murder case in which the victim is burned beyond recognition. When his investigations lead him back to the Dakota, Trudy finds herself wondering: how can she fall in love if she can’t even survive?

Readers of Death Unscripted, the first book in the Trudy Genova Manhattan Mystery series, will find the same pleasures in this sequel: fast pacing, engaging characters, twists and turns on the way to a satisfying close. Once again M.K. Graff reveals her talents in crafting this delightful mix of amateur sleuth and police procedural.

I fell in love — not only with co-protagonists, Trudy and Ned, the richly detailed and historic setting of The Dakota, and the unique cast of characters, but with the unusual plot of Death at the Dakota. Sherry Harris, Agatha Award nominated author of the Sarah Winston Garage Sale Mysteries.

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Erin Kelly: Stone Mothers Tuesday, Apr 30 2019 

Erin Kelly’s Stone Mothers bring a suspense thriller standalone to readers when the protagonist, Marianne Thackeray, must spent time in a flat in the renovated mental hospital near where she grew up.

With her mother in the throes of dementia and Marianne’s sister bearing the brunt of her care, Marianne has returned to the area on leave to help out. Her helpful husband doesn’t understand the history this place holds for her, when she and her boyfriend at the time were joined irrevocably by events that tie them together in an enormous secret that has affected her life ever since.

That secret revolves around a current member of the House of Lords member Helen Greenlaw. When Marianne’s history with Jesse and the secrets they hold threaten to rise to the surface, everything Marianne has built, from her life with her husband and her career, to her daughter, Honor, will be sacrificed. She can’t let that happen.

Working backwards in time to tell the story, Kelly hikes up the tension in a psychological thriller that becomes terrifying.

This is a multi-layered story, about darkness and how secrets can grip you in their thrall to allow the past to overshadow the present. The setting adds a gothic element that adds to this haunting novel that will have horrific consequences for more than one character. The themes of motherhood and what that means to different people, coupled with mental health issues revolved in different factions in the story.

Shirley Rousseau Murphy: Cat Chase the Moon Friday, Apr 26 2019 

Readers know that any series that can stretch to its 21st installment must have a good following for a resason. Shirely Rousseau Murphy’s Cat Chase the Moon brings her Joe Grey cozies back with a new case that will involve the entire cat community, those that speak and those that don’t.

If you haven’t read a Joe Grey book yet, now’s the time to get acquainted with Joe and his partner, Dulcie, and their brood. Able to speak to several humans who keep their secret, Joe and Dulcie prowl around their town of Molina Point when their teenaged kitten Courtney goes missing. Stolen by Ulrich Seaver and ensconed in his pretty antique shop, Courtney doesn’t understand at first that her pampering days will soon lead to something far more dangerous. Soon the entire town in involved in a cat hunt for the pretty missing calico.

At the same time, a young woman is discovered in a shallow grave, left for dead. She’s rescued in time to be saved, and while under police protection, gives details of a theft ring that ties in to a family in town known for their spectacular domestic arguments. Unfortunately, a young girl is lost in the middle of these hostile parents who had managed to arouse angry feelings in their neighbors. But how far do their activites go beyond their own troubles?

Joe is the one who understands how these disparate threads are woven together as the humans investigate with a little help from their feline friends. Perfect reading for cat lovers, fans of Mandy Morton’s Hettie Bagshot series, or anyone looking for an inside look into the world of cats who can talk, framed in a cozy mystery from the author who has received eleven national Cat Writers’ Association medals for Best Novel of the Year.

Lexie Elliott: The Missing Years Tuesday, Apr 23 2019 


After last year’s explosive debut, The French Girl, Lexie Elliott returns with another strong psychological thriller that explores the ideas of shifting memories and truths in The Missing Years.

Meet Ailsa Calder, a producer of investigative journalism who’s inherited her family home, The Manse, set in the hills of the Scottish Highlands, a nicely gothic setting for the story she unfolds. When her mother dies, Ailsa finds her inheritence is her mother’s half of the home. With her father missing for decades, she must have him declared legally dead in Scotland to inherit his half of the creeky old place.

She brings her half sister, actress Carrie, with her as she sets up camp in the house and tries to figure out if she even wants the old home. Foreboding and far too large, she feels she will sell it at as soon as possible. But this is a chance for her and Carrie to spend time together, even if she feels, ridiculously so, that the house doens’t want her there.

Ailsa, traveling the world on assignment, has had a long-term relationship with an older reporter, and she’s unclear about their future together. Then strange things start to happen at The Manse, from threatening notes to dead animals turning up on her doorstep, and she’s uncertain she has a future at all.

The locals Ailsa meets and becomes involved with are distinctly drawn, and function to serve not only as steadying influences but also devil’s advocates of a kind, as Ailsa starts to have difficulty deciding what is real and what is her imagination. Does the house want her to leave, or to uncover its secrets? Who can she trust amongst her new cadre of friends?

With overtones of Gaslight, the tension rises as the mystery into her father’s past rises to the surface in a chilling climax.

This one will have readers flipping pages long after the lights should be out. Elliott owes Auntie M a night’s sleep! Highly recommended.

Louise Beech: Call Me Star Girl Sunday, Apr 21 2019 

Louise Beech is an author Auntie M had been wanting to read, so it was with great anticipation that she opened the pages of Call Me Star Girl–and she was not disappointed.

Stella McKeever is an unusual young woman. The book alternates between THEN and NOW, as her past story is spooled out in a chilling way that heightens the tension. Working in radio, Stella has decided to leave her show, and on her last night, she urges listeners to call in and share their secrets and she will share some of her own.

Stella’s secrets include her mother, Elizabeth, who walked out on Stella fourteen years ago, leaving the young girl in the care of a neighbor. Elizabeth is now back in her life, wanting to repair things. Stella’s never met her father; but she does know the scent of the perfume bottle her mother left with her that has become her talisman. Its star-shaped stopper brings good memories of Stella’s mother, memories Stella holds onto as her life takes an unexpected turn when she falls in love, hard, for Tom.

Then a young woman is found murdered in an alley. After, a man calls the station and tells Stella he knows who killed the pregant girl. Stella is determinined to get him to come forward to tell what he knows, despite the consequences. She dangles telling her own secrets to find out the truth. For Stella has been keeping a giant, horrific secret, one that will have a devastating effect.

A psychological thriller with a dark side to it, this complex story will have readers totally engrossed in Stella, her life and her secrets. Taut writing will keep readers flipping pages long after the lights should be out.

A. M. Peacock: Open Grave Thursday, Apr 18 2019 

Auntie M just finished reading A. M. Peacock’s debut serial killer thriller, Open Grave, which introduces DCI Jack Lambert. Having managed to hurt or offend pretty much everyone in his life, struggling with his own choices, Lambert is a workaholic who heads a team tasked with unraveling murders where two victims are buried and then dug up. Whether they two know each other is just one of the many items under investigation. In a realistic light, this isn’t the only case on the team’s plate. An effective start with a Newcastle setting to what promises to be a strong series, here’s Peacock’s story on is inspiration for the book. And Happy Birthday!

My inspiration for Open Grave:

Before I began writing Open Grave, my education consisted of a healthy obsession with reading crime fiction. A number of years ago, I discovered Stuart MacBride and read Cold Granite cover to cover in two days. From then on, I was hooked. I got the chance to see MacBride at a local library event, before he became a household name, and took the opportunity to pick his brains regarding the process of writing a book and how he came to be published.

In fact, this is a common thread in my journey to publication. A number of authors I admire have provided both inspiration and advice to me, whether this was due to a question at an event, or having the opportunity to meet them in another capacity. Authors such as Mari Hannah, Tess Gerritsen and Ann Cleeves all contributed to my own journey to publication in different ways.

Like most writers, I also write short fiction, and I have been published on multiple occasions. Before migrating onto writing longer fiction, this gave me confidence in my ability to pen something worthwhile. Also, like most writers, I wrote a very ‘autobiographical’ 70k word novel that is currently sitting in a drawer never to be read again. Once this was out of my system, and the stabilisers had been removed, it felt natural for me to delve into the world of crime.

I am constantly inspired by a number of other writers. Other than those highlighted above, I absolutely adore books by Jo Nesbo, Henning Mankell, Lee Child and Dennis Lehane. I think the ability to create characters that you care about, with interesting crimes and a strong sense of environment, is the key to good crime writing. The authors I mention above all do this.

It’s no coincidence that my novel is set in the bleak Newcastle winter. Granted, we don’t get much sun in the North East of England anyway, but there is something much more atmospheric about a cold, grey, miserable setting, than a sunny jaunt by the seaside in my hometown of South Shields.

With regards to my main character, I was keen to bring Jack Lambert to life by giving him an interesting back story, one which would impact on everything he does. Jack, the hero of the book, is one of the only gay male detectives I can think of. When Open Grave begins, we see that he has only recently admitted this to the people around him. Because of this, we see a tension amongst those who know him and within Jack himself. He also comes from a troubled background, with links to a local gang.

This may or may not impact heavily on the story as things progress…

Open Grave, the first in the DCI Jack Lambert series, is available now in paperback, audiobook and ebook, via Amazon and other book retailers. As for book two, it’s just about done, so watch this space…

A.M. Peacock grew up in the North East of England before leaving to study for a degree in music technology at the University of Hull. A subsequent return to his hometown of South Shields saw him spend seven years as a teacher in a local college before changing careers to become a trade union official.

Having always been an avid reader, he took to writing after being encouraged to do so by his PGCE tutor. He has since gone on to produce a number of short stories, winning the Writers’ Forum Magazine competition on two occasions, as well as producing articles for both the local press and a university magazine.

A.M. Peacock is passionate about crime fiction and his debut novel, Open Grave, is the first in what will become a series of books featuring Newcastle-based detective, DCI Jack Lambert.

Away from writing, A.M. Peacock enjoys watching films, playing guitar and can often be found pavement pounding in preparation for the odd half marathon.

A.M. Peacock can be found on Twitter at @ampeacockwriter.

Max Allan Collins: Girl Most Likely Tuesday, Apr 16 2019 

Max Allan Collins takes on a Midwest high school reunion in Girl Most Likely, a thriller where no one is who they seem to be, except perhaps Krista Larson, Galena, Illinois police chief.

Known as the youngest female chief in the country, Krista is merely following in the footsteps of her father, a rencetly retired homicide detective. This is a scenic area, filled with tourists at times, a place where the crime rate is refreshingly low.

That is, until this reunion, where the young woman voted “Girl Most Likely to Succeed” returns to flaunt her career as a TV news anchor and investigative reporter. Astrid Lund has left many hearts broken in her wake, and friends who she’s left in the dust. Krista has just broken up with her boyfriend, and takes her father to the main event, held at a lodge where many of those from out of town are staying, thanks to yet another classmate.

Several teachers show up at the reunion, and there’s the usual rash of broken romances and gossip to talk about. Then Astrid is found dead and the page-turner takes off, but will her death be the last?

Instead of partying with her classmates, Krista slips into her chief’s role and begin the arduous task of flushing out the killer. To help her with this, she enlists the best detective she knows—her father–as a pro bono consultant. With a department as small as Galena’s, she needs all the expertise she can muster, while hoping to avoid calling in state authorities. While Keith Larson finds himself traveling Chicago and getting involved in a mob subplot (remember, this is fiction!) he adds a nice counterpoint to Krista’s moves back in Galena.

With a death of another student found in Florida tied into one in Galena,Krista looks for connections. Although this is her first homicide investigation,she forms a plan and runs a tight investigation with her small crew, Tinterviewing everyone who attended the reunion. Krista chooses her “favorites” to interrogate herself, those she deems more suspicious than the others, based on their shared history and her own knowledge. There will be several friends she upsets as she pursues a killer, those not used to Krista in her role as chief.

Part police procedural, part mystery, there’s enough here in terms of character and setting for Krista and her dad to form a detecting team for a series, if Collins is so inclined.

Diane Les Becquets: The Last Woman in the Forest Wednesday, Apr 10 2019 


Author Les Becquets calls on her love of nature, coupled with a a string of real-life murders, and brings the experience of her own horrific assault to meld The Last Woman in the Forest into a consuming and deliberate high tension thriller.

Loner Marian Engstrom loves working with rescue dogs to help her track endangered wildlife amidst conservation efforts from the oil industry. A personal tragedy in northern Alberta has her questioning everything she once believed about the man she loved, Tate, and puts Marian on a quest to find the still-open serial killer of at least four women.

There are scenes of breath-takiing beauty and wilderness survival as Marian enlists the help of a retired forensic profiler, Nick Shepherd, to help her reach the truth–could the man she loved have been a serial killer?

With victim reports interspersed throughout, this character-driven thriller moves around timelines. Getting inside the head of a serial killer is done well, and as the two investigate, every time Marian thinks she’s uncovered something that points to Tate’s innocence, another clue points to his guilt.

With a startling climax, this is one that will keep readers wondering until its climax. The result is that women must take their own instincts into account, perhaps more than they are trained to do. A suspenseful thriller that will grip readers.

Jan McCanless:The Opera House Murders Wednesday, Mar 27 2019 

Please welcome Jan McCanless, whose two series are filled with humor, to describe her newest book, The Opera House Murders:

The Opera House Murders is the 15th book by award-winning author Jan McCanless. Her Beryl’s Cove Mystery series has been hugely popular, as has her Brother Jerome books. This is the third in her Brother Jerome series, and all those endearing characters are back, along with some visitors from Beryl’s Cove, including Dawg and Elvis.

This time around Abbot Jerome, everybodys favorite misfit monk, is called to England by his feisty, favorite relative, his Aunt Jessie. She has a family secret she wants to impart to “Chip”, the Abbot, but, somehow she can’t seem to get around to it. Someone has killed the Lord of the manner, Lord Julian Spencer, and everyone is a suspect. Her Ladyship proves to be a formidable character herself.

Things that go bump in the night, and hidden rooms are in the offering, as Chip tries to remain the one ‘adult in the room.” Once back at the Monastery of the Blue Ridge, in North Carolina, things don’t improve any, as the Abbot is called to Charlotte by his Bishop, due to things being amiss in the diocese. Chip is just the one to solve the mystery, the Bishop thinks.

With hardly a moment to himself and his misfit monks, Chip’s life is complicated further by a fire that destroys the monk’s barn, and the appearance on the scene of a comely female Episcopal priest, in the mountains on retreat.

How Abbot Jerome balances all this turmoil and solves his crises of faith makes for another interesting, fun read by Author Jan McCanless.

The book is available in area gift shops ( Statesville and mid western gift shops expecially), the public library, Amazon.com, and can be purchased at Jans website : http://www.janmacbooks.com

ALSO AVAILABLE ON KINDLE

Kjell Ola Dahl: The Courier Sunday, Mar 24 2019 

Kjell Ola Dahl’s The Courier starts out in Oslo, where in 1942 a young Jewish courier, Ester, escapes the Gestapo and the horrors of Auschwitz.

Turid is the young daughter of Ester’s best friend, Ase, murdered after Ase helped Ester flee to Sweden. And then there is Falkum, Ase’s husband, baby Turid’s father, and years later, Ester’s lover?

With the action alternating between events of the time, and now with Turid almost grown, the plot resonates with emotion in each period. The complex story never loses the reader yet brings the horrors of WWII to the forefront and it reverberations to so many.

It is an accomplished writer who can combine the tragedies of historical fiction with what is essenntially a murder mystery. The thriller aspects of each time period, the 1940s, the 1960s and the close present, are highly articulated and create a visual and cinematic timeline.

Dahl does a great job keeping the tension up as the narrative threads become increasingly intertwined and the truths of each era become apparent. The jumps in this timeline, far from disturbing, feel natural as the characters are well developed both in physical appearance and the way they change over the years.

The pace continues to pick up, from the opening when Ester sees her father being arrested, to the climax as the story becomes increasingly gripping.

A solid, dark mystery with elegant prose, Dahl won two award for The Courier when it was first published before being translated into English.

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Pamela J Castrucci

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Lee Lofland

The Graveyard Shift

Being Author

Book promotion & authors BLOG

S L Hollister, author

Welcome to Leeward

Liz Loves Books

The Wonderful World of Reading

The Life of Guppy

the care and feeding of our little fish

dru's book musings

Reading is a wonderful adventure!

JoHanna Massey

"I tramp the perpetual journey." Walt Whitman

MiddleSisterReviews.com

(mid'-l sis'-tǝr) n. the reader's favorite sister

My train of thoughts on...

Smile! Don't look back in anger.

Emma kayne

interior design student - maker

K.R. Morrison, Author

My author site--news and other stuff about books and things

The Wickeds

Wicked Good Mysteries

Some Days You Do ...

Writers & Writing, my own & other people's; movies, art, music & the search for a perfect flat white - the bits & pieces of a writing life.

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Authors and reviewers of historical crime fiction

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Mellotone70Up

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